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Author Topic: Repairing a bar  (Read 5407 times)

Offline LeFranck

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Repairing a bar
« on: August 13, 2011, 08:13:41 AM »
I do not know if this is normal for any of you.
In Congo we normally prefer Stihl Duromatic bars.
Some times we experience too much wear on the titanic tip of the bar.
With no reserve we have to fix that, fuse two bars into one.
One have to much wear on the side and the other on the tip.

Frank Thoresen

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Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2011, 09:21:16 AM »
God Bless you guys!  We are so spoiled in this country no one would take the time to do what your doing to keep equipment running.  My hats off to you and your crew!

Now on another topic, what type of wood is the beutiful crotchwood figured work bench he is working on?

It looks like the base and legs are rock or some type of brick but the bench looks to be wood with all that figure on the side.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one is watching!

Offline LeFranck

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2011, 10:26:14 AM »
God Bless you guys!  We are so spoiled in this country no one would take the time to do what your doing to keep equipment running.  My hats off to you and your crew!

Now on another topic, what type of wood is the beutiful crotchwood figured work bench he is working on?

It looks like the base and legs are rock or some type of brick but the bench looks to be wood with all that figure on the side.

That is not really a work bench. He is working on the cement porch and used a white mahogany plank to have some thing to fix the bar to. The picture is taken at the workshop on the baptist mission where I grew up back in the 80's.
 
Frank Thoresen

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Pictures: www.flickr.com/photos/focusbondo/

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2011, 05:34:34 PM »
Sthil has a new bar out that just blew my mind.   They are much lighter in weight by pounds.  One of my past students came by a few days ago and had a 32" on his 460

Offline LeFranck

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2011, 06:01:59 PM »
Sthil has a new bar out that just blew my mind.   They are much lighter in weight by pounds.  One of my past students came by a few days ago and had a 32" on his 460


Can you try to find the name of that bar? Is it a professional logging bar?
We use mostly Duramatic and some Rollomatic. We are having problems with Rollomatic as the roller on the tip often get packed with sawdust mixed with oil. The tip gets really overheated. The overheating is something we experience normally on the smaller bars (22 - 25 inches). The larges 59 inch bar is not overheating as the smaller ones.

The overheating happened when we were sawmilling, mounted on the Logosol Big Mill LSG. The chainsaw ran for 30 minutes cutting boards.
When we changed the smaller bars to Duramatic the problem went away.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2011, 06:15:36 PM by LeFranck »
Frank Thoresen

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Pictures: www.flickr.com/photos/focusbondo/

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2011, 06:07:43 PM »
I will do just that, tomorrow at my Stihl shop, here in town.  I have been dealing with them forover forty years.

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2011, 08:17:48 PM »
Get the info for me too Frank!  I will get with you this week on it  ;D
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Repairing a bar
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2011, 11:18:56 AM »
Stihl is making such a bar with the same kind of materital that is now being used in many golf clubs.  Oregon bar is doing the same kind of idea, but less stable on the longer bars.  More info to come.