alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description

Author Topic: Tornado trees  (Read 12536 times)

Offline SDB777

  • Senior Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
  • Topics: 68
  • Referrals: 0
Tornado trees
« on: September 22, 2011, 08:13:30 AM »
Local person that had been part of a good size tornado(EF3/4-ish size) has some trees that need cleaned up. And I'm in need of some logs to mill for lumber/beams....free work for free logs(you get the idea)


-No powerlines, buildings, or city utilities are anywhere near where the trees that are damaged are located.
-This this rural property and no trees can be felled that are not leaning or 'rootballed'.

-Anything scary that my twisted mind has already thought up and missed?


Should I write something up along the lines of a 'Release' or something?  Do I need to write up anything telling the landowner that I am not insured, nor claim to be....and that any damages that may/may not happen are not my fault or something?

Thanks



Scott (just don't want to be sued) B B
Just got my website up/running:    www.slabsblanksandboards.com
Where I get 95% of my chainsaw needs:    www.pinnaclearboristsupplies.com/

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

  • Administrator
  • Old Timers Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 1965
  • Topics: 145
  • Referrals: 11
    • www.TanglewoodTimber@aol.com
Re: Tornado trees
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2011, 10:35:08 PM »
Get him to sign as hold harmless statement, on your behalf, due to your getting injured, due to your being careless, or something.  Check your home owners policy, to see if you have any insurance coverage for such things

Offline Stevem

  • Old Timers Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 1106
  • Topics: 100
  • Referrals: 1
Re: Tornado trees
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2011, 11:53:05 PM »
And be aware that wind fall trees can be under a lot of tension as you make the first cut.  They can jump as cut in any direction or bind the saw in the cut.  Really embarrassing with an audience.

Showed one pen I made and got an order for 15.  Now got to figure out how to do it "right."  Going to be spalted Myrtle Wood which I have a lot of now.

Enjoy your sawing hobby.
Stevem
Because you can doesn't mean you should!

Offline SDB777

  • Senior Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
  • Topics: 68
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Tornado trees
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2011, 11:44:37 AM »
Hold harmless is sound advise.  I'll need to wander around the 'net for a minute and find one that will fit my needs....shouldn't be a problem there, everything less is on the 'net.



Went to the two places yesterday morning to 'inspect'. 
Things sure are different from one site to another! 
First place was just a basic 'clean-up' with maybe two short sections that I could use for my needs(and no telling how bad the inside of the tree looks without knocking it down-top was ripped out and it had some hollow knots).  Thinking this site would be really nice if someone needed to cut about 2 cords of firewood for next winter.

Second place......dream come true!  Straight line winds pushed over about 15 - 30"+ Oaks, 4 - 15"+ Cherry, and maybe 6 - 26"+ unknowns(think they are Sweetgum).  All the trees are laying in fields that are kept very well, and no rocks to be found anywhere!

Already cut one of the Sweetgums and scored 2 - 8-1/2' logs(butt was 29"-might need to do some trimming once it's on my mill to get the head past it), 2 - gaint crotches, and some small main trunk limbs.....not bad for 2-1/2 hours!



Scott (hobby-yeah right) B
Just got my website up/running:    www.slabsblanksandboards.com
Where I get 95% of my chainsaw needs:    www.pinnaclearboristsupplies.com/

Offline Stevem

  • Old Timers Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 1106
  • Topics: 100
  • Referrals: 1
Re: Tornado trees
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2011, 08:30:53 PM »
SDB777,

Nice find!  Are you going to build a drying shed to put the sawn boards in?

One of the reasons that mills don't like "yard" trees is people hang "Yard Sale" signs on them and don't take the nails out when they take the sign down, if they ever take it down.  

FWIW:

You might want to consider some sort of metal detector to check logs for metal before you saw.  One 16d nail = one saw blade.  Mine doubles as another hobby interest.  

In oak, chestnut and black walnut (at least) nails stain the wood black to black blue.  I've found nails over 10" deep and of course no sign of the nail on the outside.  Frank tells me the stain runs down the tree verses up.  So if you see stain in the stump or but cut the tree has iron in it. Most nails (not all) are from 4' to 7' above ground level.  Metal detectors won't find lead bullets but they cut easy anyway.

  
Stevem
Because you can doesn't mean you should!

Offline bandmiller2

  • Senior Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 369
  • Topics: 37
  • Referrals: 1
Re: Tornado trees
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2016, 08:14:35 PM »
Not to be a spoil sport mate but if those trees were twisted they may be no good for milling especially timbers. I know lightning struck trees are usually not worth cutting. I would try a couple of logs before commiting to the lot. Frank C.