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Author Topic: addicted to millling....Again  (Read 8217 times)

Offline kpantherpro

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addicted to millling....Again
« on: August 06, 2012, 01:07:43 PM »
OK some of you know me because of the chainsaw mills I make, and others well i hope you get to know me or we can share insight and experiences, in this awesome addiction whether it be as your source of income or a hobby. as a mill maker I don't actually get to mill as much as you would think, i spend more time making them, but i got a great deal on a husky 3120 a couple months ago, and thought i would get to mill alot sooner than last week, so finally had some free time and a nieghbor had a  32" cedar fall across thier drive, and me finally having some time seized the moment, the night before i pulled out a couple saws, including mounting the 3120 into one of my panthermill 2 chainsaw mills, checked the chains and fluids, safety gear, etc. loaded up the trailer i've been considering turning into a milling trailer and the next morning away I went. I loaded the log onto the trailer with one of the winchs to get to a comfortable working height, also i did lower the tongue of the trailer to ground level which will let gravity do the work and save me any effort of having to push the mill through the wood (please also note that if you do have to push too hard to mill through a log something is wrong, usually incorrect sharpening or worn/bent bar or chain), which I do recommend when when using a slabbing mill of this type. mounted the slabbing rail/starter rail and away i went, my first cut I used a standard chain sharpened at 30 degrees, rakers filed just a bit and used an auxillary oiler filled with pinesol and water, as well as the standard oiler, through the whole session. going downhill it did cut well, but for my next pass i filed the rakers down more and the cutters to about 20 degrees, the cut was better and i noticed it cut faster, my next pass i took it to 10 degrees and filed the rakers down even more, oh yeah this babies runnin now....
as far as the chainsaw mill this thing is so accurate it's not even funny, it is stable and stoic, weight isn't even an issue as your milling in fact one of the reason's it is made of steel is for durability, and in my experience the steel construction actually helps the milling process, it is a pleasure everytime i do get the chance to use this mill. The husky 3120 is a monster it's 120cc of pure torque, it pulled that full chain through that cedar like nothing, and as filed the rakers down more and more i started to get the curly q's, it usually takes me a few sharpenings to get those from my chains, but basically for those of you who don't know, you do not need to buy ripping chain, you can use a stock chain either full or skip, and sharpen to your preferrance usually 10-18 degrees depending on what your cutting and the power of the saw your using, also i did notice that with some of the ripping chain I havepurchased may be too aggressive through the species of wood or power of certain saws, i preferred skip but after using this full I may change my mind, my last cuts were so smooth i almost wouldn't need a planer, I plan on getting some more full, skip and carbide and try them out and let you all know what I find.  ok to mill the entire log took me less than 2 enjoyable hours it was about 3-5 minutes per pass, which through a 32" by 8' log is good, it really felt more like 30 seconds, I used about 3/4 gallons of gas, and for under $450 including the mill and the saw, like i said I got an awesome deal on the saw. i really can"t complain, some i'll use for a sofa table some more of it i'll do some light fixtures with, there is a big burl on the back of one piece i haven't decided what to do with yet. here's a few pics don't want to overlaod as i now relized this is almost a book.  as for the pics i'll try again

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2012, 01:23:52 PM »
if someone knows how to post pics i'd be glad to post some

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2012, 11:21:48 AM »
Post #7 in this thread tells you how to post pictures steb by step.  Please refrain from turning the thread into a sales pitch!  http://www.sawmillandtimberforum.com/index.php/topic,58.0.html
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one is watching!

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2012, 12:26:46 PM »
sorry this was not intended to sound like a sales pitch, that's why no where was my website or contact info given, this was a shared experience, with hopefully enough info to help some other sawmillers out there, yes in the past i have tried to get my name out there, and yes i do believe in my mills, but if you reread the article, it was about enjoying what i was using, what i used, and relistic costs, relistic expectations... nothing more nothing less

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2012, 08:11:20 PM »
Not implying it was a sales pitch, just dont want it to turn into one  ;)
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one is watching!

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2012, 07:34:21 AM »
Kirk I understand, and in the past i have come across as being that way,  it was an attempt to bring some new life to your wonderful forum, but even i  have to say it may have been too much, you may have noticed if you look at my more recent articles that they are trying to educate or share experiences and possibly get some new interest going, hopefullly encourage others to share thiers as well... from now on if my info is listed in the article it will be for comparison purposes, or possibly for some how to video's i would like to do to help others get a grasp on ways to do things easier or better, or just another way...keep up the good work
thanks and God Bless

Offline Stevem

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2012, 11:00:22 AM »
Let's talk about chain filing for slabbing.

Quote
my next pass i took it to 10 degrees and filed the rakers down even more, oh yeah this babies runnin now

I've got the slabber attachment for my Lucas.  It runs a .404 chain filed at 10 degrees.  It doesn't cut as I think it should. Push, push and push some more.

The saw motor, 27 hp (and currently 30hp on newer models), doesn't hardly load and never hits the governor to open the throttle more.   I know that competition chainsawers practically remove the rakers to get a faster cut but that's really a special case.  I know that on a standard cut with a chain saw, cross cut, if the chain is sharpened properly the saw 'Pulls" itself into the cut and little downward pressure is needed.  Lucas provides what I'd call a double skip tooth chain made by Oregon  http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=ORF%2027RX100U.  It's like every other pair of teeth are gone.  Damn few teeth but I feel that's understandable if you're cutting 60" wide.  Generally though I'm not cutting that wide.

I'm wondering if I should take the rakers down more?  Or perhaps get an additional chain to use when the cut is narrower, say less than 35 inches.  

Any opinions on that?
Stevem
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Offline HaroldCR - AKA Fla.-Deadheader

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2012, 12:10:36 PM »

 Never got to use my homemade slabber yet, but, from what I read, the common opinion is take off approx 10-15% of the height of the rakers.

 I have had intense discussions with other people, that I have to file off the rakers on my crosscut sawing. I NEVER take them off, and, it pulls the motor down on each cut, until the chain is beyond use ???

 Wadda I know  ::) ::) ;D

Offline mike p

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2012, 02:12:31 PM »
Kirk I understand, and in the past i have come across as being that way,  it was an attempt to bring some new life to your wonderful forum, but even i  have to say it may have been too much, you may have noticed if you look at my more recent articles that they are trying to educate or share experiences and possibly get some new interest going, hopefullly encourage others to share thiers as well... from now on if my info is listed in the article it will be for comparison purposes, or possibly for some how to video's i would like to do to help others get a grasp on ways to do things easier or better, or just another way...keep up the good work
thanks and God Bless

how bout them pictures
sounds you had a fun milling event/time
thanks for the post i enjoyed it
Eagle's Nest Tree farm & Sawmill
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Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2012, 08:07:17 AM »
http://sawmillandtimberforum.com/gallery/catimgs/user_87.JPG we'll see if that works if so i'll post more later but it is a long process, the bulk options not working for me

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2012, 08:16:36 AM »
steve, in your case, i might talk to the manufaturer, but if your in a pinch maybe, instead of taking the rakers all the way down, just go a little at a time as you sharpen the chain.

Offline Stevem

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2012, 08:54:29 PM »
I take the rakers down every time I file the chain with a gauge.  Do I need to take more?  Do you?
Stevem
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Offline kpantherpro

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Re: addicted to millling....Again
« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2012, 08:22:04 AM »
depends... what do your shavings look like, i notice when i start to get my rakers down to where i feel they should be i start to get "curly q" shavings for lack of a better word, i usually stop there and just do touch up after that I really haven't gone any further, but i have an old chain I may be willing to sacrifice to the cause, i plan on milling some oak and maybe i'll try n find some more cedar or similar, mill them both with that chain and see what happens. I'll post some more pics in a little bit you'll start to see the shavings in some of the pics.
For people new to this you don't want fine sawdust, either means your rakers which are designed to help clean out the cut,as well as limit how much you cut with a pass of the cutter, are too tall. or your cutter/chain is dull, you will also notice that while your saw speed stays high your cutting will be minimal, the ideally sharpened/prepped chain will produce coarse sawdust to the "curly q" shavings I mentioned, you should have to hold your saw back a little as if you push too much, your saw will bog because it's cutting too much. also the raker as you look at your chain is at the front of the link, it may be slightly curved or angled and is usually narrow, that is what you file down slightly. the cutter is at the back of the link and is either/or appears (depending on your chain) to be bent or rounded over to a 90degree angle, this depending on what you are cutting and the power of your saw will be sharpened and sometimes this depends on who you talk to between 0-20degrees, normally i keep mine between 10-18 degrees, softer woods or more power you can go shallower angle i.e. 10 degrees, for harder woods or a saw with less power you'll want to go steeper say 18degrees.
I know to someone who's not familiar with all this it may seem like alot but once you get into it, and get a little experience behind you, it is pretty simple and hey you have this forum if you get into a bind. also do not use your milling chains for felling they have been known to kick back, i suggest changing chains out or using a prep saw for this, if you must use the same chain keep a firm hold of the saw, and as always common sense and safety gear should always be worn when doing any of this.