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Author Topic: Dimension saw or not  (Read 12781 times)

Offline DGDrls

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Dimension saw or not
« on: September 08, 2012, 05:16:53 PM »

Good evening,

pleasure to be able to post here, 
Question,  I have a little WM LT-10 which I am learning on and quite happy with minus a few technical issues with its set-up.
My question relates to sawing dimensional lumber,  sawing more than 1 or two logs of 2x4's etc Dimensional lumber is quite a bit of work,
moving off-bearing, re-sawing edges.  I'm certain I'm not the first to make these comments,
DOes anyone out there run a two mill set-up, One band saw and a dimensional unit??

If so can you weight in your experiences with production and work balance between the two.

Thank you

DGDrls

Offline Stevem

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2012, 01:53:06 AM »
I've never heard of anybody running two saws but a lot of people use an edger (which in a way is a second saw) in conjunction with their band mill.  Works good but requires a second person to really increase production.
Stevem
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Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2012, 07:20:59 AM »
Most guys I know with the LT10 or 15 will set their flitchs on saw horses to be gang cut after your done with the rest of the log.  Labor is the killer on the smaller mill.   

When you step up into the LT series with loading hooks you can just push the flitches onto the log loaders and when your done they are right there ready to slide in place. 

I dont see running two machines for what your doing being worth it.  If you have the cash for another machine, I would upgrade to a hydraulic set up that will save you time and money.

I have been running my LT40 for about 10 years now and pretty much have it down to a science when it comes to getting the most production when working by myself. 

Opening slab cut, firewood.
1st and 2nd boards, Cut and push off onto the hooks
Flip 180, repeat process.

Now I have two clean faces and when I turn the next time my blade is only going through bark on the opening and possibly 1st board being cut.  I have a debarker but there is still an advantage to minimizing how much bark your blades go through.  Less is always better!   
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Offline DGDrls

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2012, 09:56:25 AM »


Kirk, 

you are exactly correct,  as much as I love to saw I know I can't "break-out" and start any production mill business
with my Little LT.  However, it does offer the option to slab some fairly wide material easily and its paid for etc.
I recall seeing a thread here where a sawyer is using an MDM and an Oscar 36 I believe.
Will have to uncover that one again.

Thanks
DGDrls

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2012, 10:01:46 AM »
Frank Pender has a Mobile Dimension saw he uses as his primary and an Oscar that he cuts his Burles on. 
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2012, 09:35:30 PM »
And both are great money makers.  I have found that the MD mill is excellent for cutting precision dimensional lumber.  I can cut at least 2,000' a day, if the logs are decent sizes and ready for the mill.   The Oscar was to simple cut slabs for mantles and such and processing burl wood.

Offline SDB777

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2012, 08:36:43 AM »
When cutting 3/4" boards here, I make about four passes then stack them to the side on 'horses'.  I try to sort the flitches by width to save time during the edging later.



Scott (don't have room for more out back) B
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012, 10:07:25 PM »
A friend and customer from North Carolina, has brought his LT 40 out here to cut the burl wood he buys from me and others.  I have been allowed to use his mill and have done so, to cut slabs out or Maple, Yew, Walnut, Cherry and Oak.  To me his mill has demonstrated to me that it might be a good investment, for that purpose. 

For dimensional lumber and precision in dimensions I feel that my MD mill cannot be matched for purduction and precison.

Offline Stevem

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2012, 07:55:27 AM »
Well there has to be some reason they sell so many of them. 
Stevem
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Offline DGDrls

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2013, 08:41:36 PM »
MDS sawyers what species are you sawing and what products are you making with
your mills?

DGDrls

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2013, 05:48:03 PM »
I saw just about anything that grows roots, down to 7 or 8 inches in diameter. ;D

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2013, 12:18:47 PM »
Any wood that comes into the yard.  LOTS of construction material for me personally and stashing all the fine top grade wood for my wood working hobby.
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Offline Stavebuyer

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2013, 10:21:12 AM »
Some people seem do well sawing dimension but we couldn't figure out how to make it work for us. We run a Wood-Mizer LT70DCS remote mill and an edger. We tried sawing some small orders out of Hemlock into siding(7/8" x 8W"x10'L). We couldn't get much done compared to sawing random width grade lumber and had poor yield because we had no order for the narrow pieces. Also found it very difficult to saw down below 2" with the clamp on the LT70.

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Dimension saw or not
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2014, 10:14:52 PM »
Lumber from my dimensional mill goes primarely into buildings construction and or woodworking projects, furniture, kitchen cabinets, flooring window and door trim and lathe turnings.