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Author Topic: flying in Alaska  (Read 29580 times)

Offline Buzz Sawyer

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flying in Alaska
« on: November 30, 2012, 04:36:40 AM »
Here is some video of our flight near clark pass on the Alutian side of cook inlet...note there are others at same channel, Buzz
&feature=plcp

Offline HaroldCR

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Re: flying in Alaska
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 01:49:21 PM »

 Kinda like the time I flew into the Ganes Creek Gold Mine, only, your landing was smoother.  ;D :laugh: :laugh:

 Keep it up, and, I will have to buy me a ticket.  ::) ::)

Offline Buzz Sawyer

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Re: flying in Alaska
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2012, 09:36:08 PM »
THAT WAS ABOUT 18 INCHES OF WATER,  with 4 feet of grass on it , some kinda runway huh!!!
 silver salmon were due to run at that time in august, we shot guns and fished but didnt eat!

Offline HaroldCR

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Re: flying in Alaska
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2012, 11:24:59 PM »

  :o That's a lot of drag to set wheels down into.  :o  I've seen videos of those large tires used in Alaska bush flying. Also, remains of planes flipped while landing, and wrecked.

 There is a program on TV, of a guy named Reeves, in Fairbanks, that bought out Fairbanks Gold Co., years ago, and is the 3rd largest land holder in Alaska. That's the kind of guy I would be interested in working with. Set a plan, and start looking and testing.

 Anywhere around those Bucket line dredge tailings, is a good place to look. They passed decent sized to large chunks of gold, right out the back into the tailings. A GOOD detector can read out quarter sized nuggets at over 24" deep. We did beach tests on different makes and models of detectors, using measured depths to set targets, when we were diving the Fl. coast, contracting with Mel Fisher.

 Also, Magnetometers are good for spotting concentrations of black sand anomalies. When I asked you about using them, I have 2 that were working, when we shut down the business, They cab be used with choppers, flying over remote areas. Might find the remains of plane wrecks also. We used them for shipwreck searching in the Bahamas and also along the Fl. beaches. I have all the schematics, also.