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Author Topic: Blades  (Read 5970 times)

Offline mountainlake

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Blades
« on: September 25, 2014, 05:18:35 AM »
 What's everyone's favorite blade. after trying  a couple of other brands I'm back to Simonds Red Streak hardback , first and most important they cut straight plus sharpen and set nice and take a lot of sharpening and are reasonable.  Steve

Online Kirk Allen

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Re: Blades
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2014, 11:25:40 PM »
I ran a lot of Simonds Red Streak and had great luck with them.

Once I went to the CBN sharpener though it was back to Woodmizer double hard in the 7 degree blade.  The tow are comparable.

I really liked the munkfasager blade (monkey blade) as they were inexpensive when they first came out but eventually they priced themselves out of it for me. 
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Offline Tom the Sawyer

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Re: Blades
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2015, 07:27:36 AM »
Once I got my own sharpening equipment, I tried about half a dozen types of blades.  The ones that have given me the best performance were the Kasco Woodmaxx blades.  In addition to that, they were some of the least expensive, running a bit over $13 for a 150" blade.
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Offline mountainlake

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Re: Blades
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2015, 05:40:28 PM »
 Tom   
  Have you tried Simonds Red Streak yet, I just got through trying some Kasco a Dakin Flathers blades and I'm going back to Simonds Red Streak 3/4 pitch .042  1- 1/4 and  don't think I'll try another brand again as they saw the straightest and last a long time.  The Kasco  didn't saw straight at all until I sharpened them about 3 times ( A mill 20 miles south of me said exactly the same thing ) and the Dakin Flathers sawed OK but not as good as the Simonds.  Try SE metals LLc,  good prices on several brands.   Steve

Offline Tom the Sawyer

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Re: Blades
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2015, 09:00:01 PM »
Steve,
Yes, I tried Simonds Red Streak in 2013, along with Monks, DF, WM, Lenox, TK, Suffolk and Kasco.  I get an average of 245 bf per sharpening with SRS, similar to the Lenox.  Overall, for me the DF, TK ultramax and Kasco give the best life.  I mill mostly urban hardwoods, pine species only accounted for 2.5% of last year's production.
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Offline xlogger

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Re: Blades
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2015, 05:46:59 AM »
Tom, I forgot do you have the same sharpener as Steve and I have? I'm still not happy with the way I sharpen my blades, just don't last as long after resharp as I think they should. Ricky

Offline mountainlake

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Re: Blades
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2015, 07:56:06 AM »
 Ricky
  Post some pics of your sharpened blades from a few different angles.   Steve

Offline xlogger

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Re: Blades
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2015, 06:32:34 PM »
pictures not good enough to see good.

Offline Tom the Sawyer

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Re: Blades
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2015, 09:52:57 PM »
Ricky,

I have the Timberking Talon Sharpener.  A couple of years ago they started manufacturing their own automatic sharpener and dual tooth setter.  I had both.  I could never get the setter to work for me (breaking teeth) and traded it for a Suffolk dual tooth setter.  They used to sell the Suffolk setter and an automatic sharpener (Dino or Wright I believe) before designing their own.

Their automatic setter is a drag-type dry grinder.  I have found that it easily adjusts to a wide range of tooth profiles and angles.  I've not seen any significant benefit of one profile over another so mine are migrating to a common profile.  I set first and then sharpen (don't have to worry about the burr that way) and I think it gets them sharper than new blades.
Timberking B-20, log arch, F350 flatbed dump,
20' Trailer w/ log loading arch, Princeton forklift, Bobcat S250 w/ Frostbite grapple.  Nyle L200M kiln.