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Author Topic: Abouth log homes, building proces...  (Read 16695 times)

Offline lauztuvass

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Abouth log homes, building proces...
« on: December 10, 2015, 11:58:31 AM »
So, where is someone who build log house by his own hands? Or live in new one log house?

Online furu

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2015, 07:16:17 PM »
We are going to build a log home.  While I will be doing some of the work I will not be doing all of it and I will not be building the outer shell.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.

Offline John B

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2015, 05:46:23 AM »
I have built several log homes.

Do you have a design in mind?

What is your climate like in Lithuania?

Offline John B

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2015, 11:29:42 PM »
I have a bit more time an a few more thoughts than I had in my first post.

Log cabins do well in colder, dry climates.

You can build a log home just about anywhere, but additional steps must be taken in warm and / or wet envroments.

There are at least 4 different log types that can be used.
    1.) Round logs with scribed joints.
    2.) 3 Sided logs with "butt and pass" or "notch and point" joint" joints.
    3.) 2 Sided logs with "notch and point" joints, or a combination of butt and pass / scribed joints.
    4.) 4 Sided "square" logs can use any of the above joints, or compound "dovetail joints"

I have used 1-3 extensively, and can answer any questions you may have.

I have never built a home with square logs and dovetail joints. This method may be necessary in wet envroments, where rot in the corners in a concern.
I'll post some pictures when I get back to the office if anyone is interested.

Thanks,
John

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Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2015, 02:00:43 AM »
Very good. At first, I want to say thanks for replys guys.
In my country climate is very different. In summer we have 20- 30 temperature celcium hot air. In night we have abouth 15- 20 temperature. Also where we have rain two times in week. Abouth. In autumn we have rain, wind and temperature from -2 to +12 degree celcium.  Winter also not intresting- from +2 celcium to -30celcium, wind until 16m/s . Rain and snow.
I am thinking to build house and live in it all my life. There is a alot of builders. I was tryed to get more info but.... In my country, all builders said that is cold home from logs. Also, i tryed to get more info abouth logs (timber) warmth resistivity. It is intresting fing. Contructions time-limit   ( of Lithunian laws institutions) says ,that wood have only 2 warmth resistivity. In one article from America, i found that this warmth resistivity is abouth 10. And this number is  from test ( they build somewhere in America six or more the same houses from different material and count expenses for heating). So, what You can say abouth wood home in cold climate? thanks for your advise. And sorry for my bad language.

Offline Stevem

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2015, 10:14:47 AM »
R values for solid wood that I can find are between 1 and 1.25 per inch (25.4 cm) thus an 8" wall (~200 mm) would be between 8 to 10 R value.

Recommend R values for home walls where I live in Oregon is between 13 and 17 depending on wall construction, 3 times that for the ceiling, and 2 times for the floor.  http://energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCodeReqs/index.jsp?state=Oregon

To get the recommend R value for the walls in a log house you need to add insulation either inside or outside or both or have a big heater and lots of fuel. :laugh:
Stevem
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Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2015, 10:25:36 AM »
To get the recommend R value for the walls in a log house you need to add insulation either inside or outside or both or have a big heater and lots of fuel. :laugh:
I dont want to agree with this sentence. Why? In my country , abouth 50-100 years ago, all people was living in log huoses and no one frosted  :laugh:  . And , test results (abouth test I was talking in my post before this) show, that log huoses was better keeping warm in side then over houses.  ::)

Online furu

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2015, 11:40:48 AM »
There is thermal mass that is involved. 
Yes the R-value of log is less than insulation for the same thickness but the thermal mass in some but not all cases counters it.  Getting local code folks to understand the thermal mass effects can be a challenge at times.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.

Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2015, 12:43:07 PM »
Wood is intresting thing  ;) .
I am a forester, i like forest.

Offline John B

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2015, 09:14:37 PM »
A correctly built log home can be kept very warm in winter.

Logs from softwood trees such as spruce grown in northern climates, tend to have a higher R value.

I started building log homes in Alaska. That far north 9" spruce logs counted as R16.

The 2 important things are: build it right (eliminate all air gaps), and over insulate the roof.

Folks that build log homes usually live in a forest with easy (free) access to firewood.

If you are heating with wood, the fire needs to run continuous, throw an extra log or two in the stove each time you fill it, and you will be warm.

Oil and gas heat only run as needed. If you heat with fossil fuels that are purchased, hold on to your wallet.

Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2015, 10:40:37 AM »
In my case -everyfing is in future:

I my heateting system will be with wood. Sometimes it will be coal. With oil and gas is too much difficult in my case . . Also I am think about flour heat, no radiator. All house will be about 100 square metre.

About log shape. In my coutry almost all are building from square logs. Like this:

host images
Its look good for my me. But I see one big problem in this. Logs likes to split from sides to centre(heart). And I hear from a lot of house owners, that wind is blowing throught these splits. Problem is more importance, if roof is light weight (in my country a lot of people is thinking , that best roof is from white metal).
 So, I dont want wind throught walls, . Its beter walls buil from rounded logs. And better tilled roof. This will be more weight, looks good for me(appearance), and more press to logs(walls). I am think somefing about :

img
More info about my minds?(Logs forms, roof cover)

Offline Stevem

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2015, 11:58:38 PM »
All boards, beams, and logs with heart center in them are prone to cracking, logs more so because you have grain orientation in all directions.  The different grains (flat sawn, quarter sawn) shrink at different rates causing strain within the wood and it's got to get relieved.  Thus the cracks.

Kerfing the log with a saw cut on the top or bottom might control where the crack is but it would take a lot of time and labor and I've never heard of anybody doing it for a house.

Also harvest time of the logs is probably a factor as the moisture content in trees vary depending on the season.  Lower moisture = smaller cracks.
Stevem
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Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2015, 09:21:22 AM »
So, how to build and dot get a big cracks? How better is to  dry a logs? In kiln or Under cover and keept for two or more years?

Offline John B

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2015, 09:46:48 PM »
You will get cracks similar to the cracks in the pictures that you posted.

The cracks (splits) will not be open through the entire diameter of the log and you will not get any wind through the splits.


You will need to prevent draft (wind) between the logs. There are several ways to do this.

   1.) Place thin strips of fiberglass insulation in between the logs during assembly.
   2.) Use construction adhesive in between the logs.
   3. Chink the seams with Permachink ore something similar.   http://www.permachink.com/


Another thing to consider is that the dryer your logs are, The higher the R value is. A roof that extends an extra foot or 2 over every side of your house will keep your logs dry and R value up.

I have always cut my logs wintertime, and built summertime. Four to six months drying time seems to work good. Keep your logs off the ground with good airflow, and some metal roofing for cover.

Here is another idea if you are worried about heating costs. You can build the first 1-1/2 stories from logs, with a knee wall and roof using conventional framing and insulation. Heat rises, 90% of your heat loss is from the top 3-4' (1M).

Here is a picture of my uncles house. I helped build it and spent many nights in it. It is warm and draft free.



I hope this helps.

Offline backwoods sawyer

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2015, 12:14:13 AM »
The log house we helped granddad build In north Idaho used 12"-18" logs, flattened on two sides using an old Corly mill, it had a 4' overhang all the way around, full basement with a wood forced air furnace. We finished it with several coats of polyurethane inside and out.
Even added glass shelves between the ends of the logs where a closet was built in the layers of logs. The first winter two of the shelves broke from the logs twisting, the shelves were removed and re-cut in several years later. Over the years splits developed in the logs and they were just filled with chinking. Used 2x12 for the ceiling and filled with blown in insulation, the upstairs was not heated.
The biggest compliant I have heard is we should have gone one log higher.

Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2015, 08:03:30 AM »
Cracks, cracks, cracks....
I know one case, huose. Was builded like in first my picture. In first years everythink was good. But after some time ,in summer bouth spilts(from sides) goes to center  and almost split in two parts. I dont know, how builders build house(maybe from green wood or..), I dont know there they made mistake.
So, small cracks i dont afraid. John, House in your picture, how big diameter is of logs?
I agree with you abouth a roof. 2 feets it looks good for me.
In my country imposible build from scot pine or north spruce. Which is better? What you think?
Also, why I so woryed abouth R of wood and heating?- Becauce I dont want to cover walls , logs is looks very good for me. Also no need  decoration , somethink like stone pannels or plastic bord for prety view.

Offline John B

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2015, 10:04:57 AM »
John, House in your picture, how big diameter is of logs?

There are 2 different size logs used in this house. 7" and 9".

I have always used spruce because that is what I had available. I would think that pine would work as well.


Offline lauztuvass

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Re: Abouth log homes, building proces...
« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2015, 03:12:50 PM »
In my country. A lot of builders says that spurce is better inside, pine better outside, becauce it not so scare of moisture, rain, water.
 So, going to foward. I think, that better will used round logs. Also, I think, that bes way is turn logs into true round shape. In this way,all logs will  be a same as one. In this way, will be less chance to do mistakes in logs joints. Becauce in my country is bad with good builders- only money in heads, all other things not matter. How is beter to joint log with log? Meaby some examples foto?
Thanks.