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Author Topic: Anvils with handles  (Read 4782 times)

Offline bandmiller2

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Anvils with handles
« on: April 06, 2016, 08:48:24 PM »
All my saw are old, all my equipment is old, me too. Old saws are heavy but durable. Not much of a problem for me now as I don't spend the whole day in the woods and about everything I cut is laying down. My main saw for the last 12 yrs. is an old Husky 365 I bought at a tractor pull flea market in Ct. for $3.50. The saw was used commercially and flat ass wore out. I got it running dispite low compression and figured it was worth rebuilding. The jug was fine so I replaced the piston and rings main bearings and seals. The bearings and seals were just off the shelf not Husky, and a carb kit and the rest is history, still running. If you don't have to use them all day the old heavy saws still will cut a lot of wood and the good ones are worth rebuilding. Favorites of mine are Husky 61, stihl 031 stihl 041 and sachs dolmar 119 they will run as long as you care to lug them around. Frank C.

Offline Stevem

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Re: Anvils with handles
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2016, 11:32:10 PM »
Speaking of old saws, I still run the first chainsaw that I bought about 40 years ago.  It's a Mac 10-10, with a 20" bar and 3/8" chain, early model55cc.  It is getting kind of loud as the muffler is shot and you can't buy parts for it--too old.  It's a little hard to start (it's a Mac) but runs good.  Used to run .404 chain but it just doesn't have the power it used to.  When it dies I'm going to bury it and have a ceremony of last rites.
Stevem
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Offline HaroldCR

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Re: Anvils with handles
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2016, 11:00:14 AM »

 Soon, I'm going to have to install wheels on my 041. It's constantly getting heavier.  ::)

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Anvils with handles
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2016, 07:09:57 PM »
Newer saw are like sports cars the old 041's are like driving an old Lincoln town car, kinda nice if you don't have to hump them all day. A friend gave me the 041 he got it from his father in law I don't think it has more than two or three hours of use since new. Frank C.

Online furu

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Re: Anvils with handles
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2016, 07:18:52 PM »
I have an older 026 that I have had for 22 years. 
I certainly don't think it is is old.  Maybe it is my frame of reference. 

Now my 460 Magnum it is new. I have only had it for 5 years.
The FS 450 and 250 are also new only 8 years old.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Anvils with handles
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2016, 06:41:00 AM »
Back when I was a usefull citizen I was the sole mechanic for a medium sized fire dept. When I started back in the 70's we had three homelite xl's that weren't new then, they had bounced around the truck compartments for many years. All I ever did for 31 years was to sharpen them, never a problem. I took them out of service because they didn't have a chain brake and I was worried about the younger guys using them. Frank C.