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Poll

So which do you think ?

Woodland Mills
0 (0%)
Woodmaxx
1 (25%)
Frontier
2 (50%)
Save my money and buy lumber..
1 (25%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Voting closed: February 08, 2018, 03:01:27 PM

Author Topic: Baby mill reccomendations??  (Read 15276 times)

Offline A.O.

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #350 on: April 14, 2018, 07:54:27 AM »
Glad to see you back.  Have not seen many posts from you as of late.  How is the milling going?
Thanks, didn't really go anywhere.. just been working. Still playing with the mill, trying to stockpile a little misc lumber to use around here. One of my first projects are these raised bed planters.

Heres the parts



And assembled and filled..



Two of them I tried the art of SHOU SUGI BAN on them, charing them to "waterproof" them. I did kind of a partial job on and we will see how they hold up in comparison.

Getting my mini lumber yard stocked up.



Ran out of logs and had to go fell a couple more trees to restock




So I'm still here...

Offline Ox

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #351 on: April 15, 2018, 08:21:29 AM »
Looking good.  Good idea with charring the wood.  I don't know how much it takes to make it last, but charred wood (charcoal) is found thousands of years later cause it don't rot.
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline A.O.

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #352 on: April 18, 2018, 06:52:22 AM »
Looking good.  Good idea with charring the wood.  I don't know how much it takes to make it last, but charred wood (charcoal) is found thousands of years later cause it don't rot.

Just an experiment with the charring, we will see what it does ...

Offline Ox

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #353 on: April 18, 2018, 09:05:37 AM »
I know the old timers used to char the ends of poles that were to go into the ground for pole barns, fences, etc.  They would make sure the char would come above ground a ways because the majority of rot happens at grade and just below a few inches.  If it didn't work, these fellas wouldn't have done it.  This is my way of thinking.  The old timers may have been a little ignorant about the world, but they knew what was worth doing on their home turf.  My only question is the amount of char.  To my understanding they would actually have the pole ends burning in a fire pit for a little while to get it good and charred black.  I'm not sure if the amount of char you did will last as long or what, but I'm sure it'll help to some degree and looks good to boot!  Kinda like a skip-stain and makes the grain kinda pop.
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline A.O.

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #354 on: April 18, 2018, 10:33:38 AM »
I know the old timers used to char the ends of poles that were to go into the ground for pole barns, fences, etc.  They would make sure the char would come above ground a ways because the majority of rot happens at grade and just below a few inches.  If it didn't work, these fellas wouldn't have done it.  This is my way of thinking.  The old timers may have been a little ignorant about the world, but they knew what was worth doing on their home turf.  My only question is the amount of char.  To my understanding they would actually have the pole ends burning in a fire pit for a little while to get it good and charred black.  I'm not sure if the amount of char you did will last as long or what, but I'm sure it'll help to some degree and looks good to boot!  Kinda like a skip-stain and makes the grain kinda pop.

Yes to all that.. And these are not really below grade even though filled with compost. I may also try the "super char" like you are talking on some posts.

Offline A.O.

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #355 on: April 18, 2018, 11:12:27 AM »
So this morning.. maybe my largest log yet, and I don't need any larger..



This is my loading set up, the cross pieces just slide across and a notch in them hooks to the rails..



I'm pleased with how square its cutting... knock on wood...



Cutting a slab to cut 2x4's out of..





And the spoils from this mornings log.





Now back to it..


Offline mountainlake

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Re: Baby mill reccomendations??
« Reply #356 on: April 19, 2018, 04:22:13 AM »
 

 Looks good.  Steve