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Author Topic: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit  (Read 2581 times)

Offline griffithms

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Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« on: January 23, 2018, 09:31:17 AM »
Hey y'all, this is my first post here, so be kind!

I am the president of a non-profit making affordable housing for veterans a reality in NMI.
Part of this mission is the establishment of a tiny home community, so we're looking to get a bandsaw mill.
Second to that would be the revenue-generating aspect a portable bandsaw mill could provide. By fitting in portable milling services and custom cut timbers into our business plan, we can open up a new avenue of income that will be put right back to work housing vets.

Obviously a donated saw (or enough money to buy one) is how we ultimately go about acquiring one, as a 501(c)3 we can't be super picky on what we get, so I'm less worried with brand recommendations and more looking for overall tips, advice, some ways of going about finding clients, free lumber, etc.

Any and all comments, advice, etc. welcome! You also won't hurt this Marines feelings, but there's no need to be a dick.

-Mike

Offline drobertson

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2018, 10:31:22 AM »
Hi Mike, I first want to thank you for your service to our country. And secondly thank you for your desire to work towards housing for our homeless veterans, this is a class act that needs immediate attention.
I've seen this idea  on the news and for the life of me cant' remember where, but I thought the idea not only for the housing but also within the housing area a community of sorts with the additions of stores that supply at the very least the most basic of needs. An incredible idea and fully worthy of an attempt to see it through.
All this saying when it comes to acquiring a mobile mill, for the purpose of not only supplying a need, but also supplying a revenue that in turn supplies the same need, I would say location would be one area that would need to be evaluated.   Finding the timber (logs) that will produce the building materials is at the top of the list. Knowing the building codes that need to be met another.  This undertaking  in my mind would be one that would require the resolve of a Marine. 
As to the make of saw being use not that important (at this time) is how it sounded to me at first read, well in fact is a little more important than you might think at first..  I'm just kinda rambling here in an effort to get some others to pipe in.
I ran a saw for just over 10 years, sawing out cabins, sheds, barns, you name it, custom jobs for the most part.  Having a log supply is probably on the top of the list, considering a mill is in position for the job. There will be waste to deal with, log and lumber handling support equipment will be needed, just lots of stuff, construction tools, ect... this is an undertaking for sure.. looking forward to hearing  input from others on this, lots of folks are more versed in legal logistics than I.. again thanks Mike for your efforts and desires to care for (our) veterans, they took care of us, and continue to do so.

Offline Ox

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2018, 11:10:03 AM »
Welcome aboard and thanks for your service, Marine.

I'd recommend a sawmill that can saw at least 16' long and a saw head that has roller guides.  Of course, everything can me modified to make these things happen so it's not a deal breaker if the mill don't have these things.

Your results and opinions may vary depending on who's talking!  And opinions are like assholes - everybody's got one, right?  ;D
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Offline starmac

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2018, 12:48:33 PM »
You might contact the manufacturers with your plans. I know woodmizer has donated several saws to organizations working in foreign countries, this, in my way of thinking would be a better use.
Dr Robertson has made some valid concerns as far as log availability, and the use of rough sawn lumber not allowed in structural components in many areas, you may possibly be able to get a variance in some areas for non profit tiny houses. I would not count on it being a big revenue maker, you don't see many rich sawyers.

Offline furu

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2018, 03:03:34 PM »
I second the idea of contacting some of the Manufacturers.  Woodmizer has certainly donated for overseas charities.  I don't think I have heard of Timberking, Cooks or Baker doing the same but if you don't ask you will never get the answer. 
Some local jurisdictions have codes that are lax others that are strict but most have limits that if it is under a certain square footage then a permit is not required.  The tiny house idea may fit in that exclusion.
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Offline starmac

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2018, 07:20:02 PM »
If permits and graded lumber turns out to be concerned, you may also look into the legalities of building them on a trailer frame. I ran into a guy that bought every old trailer house frame he could, he was building small houses in Arizona and it got him out of the required building permits, you can always sit them on the ground when done.

Offline Stevem

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2018, 10:24:48 AM »
My understanding of the building code is it's not rough sawn wood that's the problem.  It's ungraded wood that won't meet code requirements. 
The grade stamp transfers liability for wood failure to the grading organization, not generally a problem for smaller structures like houses.

Here's the email at TimberKing to ask:  wjohnson@timberking.com
Stevem
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Offline starmac

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2018, 03:32:21 PM »
Graded lumber is generally kiln dried and planed, but I do not think it has to be to be graded.

The one big sawmill here mainly sells their lumber rough cut, but I know they have a grader come up from Washington. They do plane some lumber, I will have to ask what all he grades. I do know that they do not kiln dry anything.

Offline Tom the Sawyer

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2018, 07:38:56 PM »
In our area, and in most areas that follow uniform building codes, lumber certified for structural use must be kiln-dried to 19% EMC, planed to consistent thickness, and graded for its intended application.  I have heard of a potential work-around if the architect specifies locally sourced or rough sawn material.  They would have to specify the species, and they would part of the liability spectrum (which many would not want to do).
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Offline starmac

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2018, 09:18:46 PM »
When The grader comes up he stays here a while (several days) and it is possible that he is grading planed lumber, though I doubt it. It is my understanding that they just plane the stuff destined to be tongue and grooved. I do know for a fact none of it has seen a kiln, but they have a big air drying yard, and it is highly likely that the spruce is below 19%, in fact I would bet on it.

Offline griffithms

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2018, 08:03:22 AM »
Fellas,

Thank you all very much for the feedback and thank you's. I think we drifted a little off topic getting into the grading requirements of lumber, haha, but it's alright!
Back to the original topic, as our upcoming fundraiser draws ever near I am nervous as sh*t, hoping we raise enough funds to purchase a home for a vet.
Once we get a couple of those under our belt we'll begin looking at the tiny home community, of which the bandsaw mill will be essential.
So the second half of the year, hopefully!

Anyways, tips and advice are still appreciated, or a pointer in the direction of a bandsaw mill would be fantastic!

Thanks!

Mike

Offline furu

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2018, 10:37:28 AM »

Anyways, tips and advice are still appreciated, or a pointer in the direction of a bandsaw mill would be fantastic!

Thanks!

Mike

Hey y'all, this is my first post here, so be kind!

I am the president of a non-profit making affordable housing for veterans a reality in NMI.



I admire your dedication and goals.  Keep at it.

Giving a pointer in the direction of a used bandsaw mill would only be possible if we knew where you are willing to travel, unless the entire country is in and therefore worth the search. (shipping would eat your lunch in many cases.)

You said in your first email: "president of a non-profit making affordable housing for veterans a reality in NMI."
I am guessing what NMI is.  Northern Michigan?  I wonder if NMI is like the UP (upper peninsula) a local name that everyone local knows but no-one else does.  First two pages of google search had nothing and did not look any further.
Have you looked on craigslist (yuk), sawmill trader or other similar sites to see what might be available other than going new?
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.

Offline griffithms

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2018, 05:17:57 PM »
Yes, sorry, I'm located in Northern Michigan. The Northern part of the lower peninsula to be exact. Traverse City area to be simple.
Have trailer and willing to travel, for sure. Not so much the ENTIRE country, but I'm not stranger to 20+ hours behind the wheel.

EDIT: I had a promising phone conversation with the management of a major sawmill manufacturing company recently. There may be some SERIOUSLY exciting news on the horizon!

Thanks again y'all!

Mike

vethousing.org

Offline drobertson

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2018, 06:14:10 PM »
Sounds like good news may lead to more good news! its' kinda catching!  Really hoping for some real positive advancements in your pursuits.  I can't hardly see where the will and success for such an endeavor would be quenched if the right people get involved, 

Offline starmac

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Re: Bandsaw Mill for my non-profit
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2018, 09:39:56 PM »
I will keepmy fingers crossed for you. A manufacturer between the tax write off and the advertisement stands a good chance of at least breaking even, if not coming out ahead, so maybe things will work out in your favor.

Speaking mainly for myself, but I doubt if many of us guys that play with sawmills need a whole lot of write offs like that. lol