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Author Topic: Edger bits  (Read 4515 times)

Offline moodnacreek

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Edger bits
« on: March 30, 2019, 07:50:10 PM »
What are edger bits? How are they different? In spite of my large collection of n.o.s. bits and shanks and owning and using edgers I have never seen them.

Offline Ox

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Re: Edger bits
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2019, 08:50:44 AM »
I remember changing a set on an edger many moons ago.  I think they're the same size as the larger saw blades because we borrowed a wrench from a guy that has a circle saw and the wrenches fit both edger and sawmill blade.  We broke 2 wrenches even after using heat.  I don't think they'd ever been changed.

If I had to guess, I'd say they're no different than sawmill bits and shanks but I don't know for sure because I've only done the one edger and no sawmills, simply based on the fact that the wrenches were identical, so if the shank wrench fits the edger and the sawmill that should mean the bits are similar too, right?  They're still going lengthwise down the grain (but now in flitch form going through the edger) just like the sawmill would be doing going down the log.

With my superior powers of intellectual prowess ???, I deduce the bits to be the same......now I better go lie down before I fall over.

P.S.  I don't think I have superior anything.  Just trying to get a chuckle maybe...
K.I.S.S. - Keep It Simple Stupid
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without
1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline kbeitz

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Re: Edger bits
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2019, 10:53:37 AM »
I thought they had less rake than normal bits...?
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Edger bits
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2019, 12:03:00 PM »
Maybe Frank will chime in.  Breaking the pin wrench when changing bits is a good way to get hurt or deeply cut. It could be a different hook [rake] angle, perhaps because of such a small diameter saw.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Edger bits
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2019, 07:21:52 PM »
I believe your correct the smaller saw would be more efficient with a different hook. I have never used a edger so I'm not sure more or less hook. Frank C.

Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Edger bits
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2019, 06:35:39 AM »
NEVER USED AN EDGER ?  And never shot a civil war cannon. Ok now I feel better in spite of the fact that you had an 830 diesel that I always wanted.  Actually if you don't cut much lumber that might be ok because getting an edger to cut straight can be harder than setting up a mill.