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Author Topic: Turner Sawmills  (Read 1156 times)

Offline jessepettengill

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Turner Sawmills
« on: December 18, 2020, 01:53:21 PM »
Hey Friends,

I am researching and comparing the Woodmizer LT40, the Hudson HD36, the Cooks HD3238, and the Timber Kind 1620 for a solid entry level hydraulic mill that meets my needs going forward.  By accident I happened upon Turner sawmills, made in New Hampshire. 

They run substantially cheaper than the aforementioned mills, but use tires for bandwheels.  They claim this is better because it keeps the blade cooler and allows for some give going through the wood and therefore lengthening the life of the blades.  Has anyone had experience with Turner, and what is your opinion of pneumatic tires vs. v groove wheels.

Thanks
JP

Online Kirk Allen

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2020, 07:36:17 AM »
While I have never ran a mill with pneumatic tires, I have spoken with many that for the most part have no problem.  The few problems I have heard were related to blade tension issues and controlling that tension.  As the air heats and cools the pressure changes and that has an effect on tension.  How big of an effect I do not know.  I only know that is what of the complaints I have heard from a few that run tires. 
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Offline Ox

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2020, 08:05:13 AM »
A Turner will saw lumber (so won't a chainsaw, though!).  I've used one before.  I've sharpened blades for two people that have Turner mills.  They always need the teeth re-set on the inside of the loop of the blade because they're always around .015 to .020 less than the outside teeth from the tires mashing them down.  These guys say the biggest problem they have with the Turner mills is the little bearings that act as blade guides(top, bottom and back of the blade), so they buy them by the sleeve at NAPA.  That's a big pro for Turner - most everything you might need comes from NAPA.  Very simple machines which is good a lot of the time. 

Serious sawyers don't have them is all I know.  Of course, these serious guys are using $50,000 and up machines too...
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Offline Tom the Sawyer

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2020, 10:52:19 AM »
I would look at the top 10, 15, or 20 band mill manufacturers (however many it takes to get to Turner), and see how many use tires for bandwheels.  Perhaps bands run cooler, none of the others seem to have problems with bands overheating under normal conditions.  "Some give" sounds like imprecision in the cutting process.  I know that there are times when I have a band break and it may take out one of the v-belts, I can only imagine what would be involved if a broken blade slashed through the tread or sidewall of a tire.
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Offline kelLOGg

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2020, 05:57:59 AM »
With rubber being a poorer conductor than steel I can't see how bands would run cooler on rubber. A steel band contacting a steel wheel would dissipate heat better. Am I missing something?








Offline Ox

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2020, 08:02:51 AM »
My mill's got rubber v-belts in the groove of sheaves/pulleys for bandwheels.  I've never had a hot or even warm blade that I can remember.  I drip kerosene onto a felt wick that rubs both sides of the blade.  This might have something to do with it.
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1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools

Offline kelLOGg

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Re: Turner Sawmills
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2020, 06:41:27 PM »
I've got crowned steel wheels and a double-sided oiler, too(diesel) but I thought it was best for cleaning the blade rather than lubrication. What ever the reason my blades don't get hot either.