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Author Topic: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill  (Read 13164 times)

Offline danweb

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Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« on: March 03, 2009, 07:39:05 PM »
Ok guys, I know I havent posted in a while, but I have definately been keeping up wit what is going on. But i have a question. I have been  given the task of milliing a 15ft sugar maple. this tree was 100 years old and it was 60" and the stupm, The log in question is 15ftlong, 60" on butt end, 50" on top end. Big swell about 7 feet up. the guy wants it quartersawn. By the way this will be my first shot at quartesawing. But my problem is that my Timberking 1600 mill, can only cut 36" logs. And that is close. So I have to quarter , or even more this large log before I can even get the sections on my saw to mill. My question is how do I get true straight cuts with a chainsaw, (Which I am going to purchase tommorrow) Either a husky 359, or a Stilk / Cant remember the number.  :-\ . With 24 inch bars. I know I need a ripping chain, but how to get the straight cut through the middle of the tree , then try and quarter a piece? I have been searching all over the net for a solution, but all I keep seeing that even comes close is the Alaskan Mill. But even those dont show the saw cutting through the middle section of a big tree like that. Any Ideas?   Thanks guys   Dan
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Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2009, 09:31:39 PM »
I have a Husky 359 and I would encourage you to go bigger if at all possible.  My minimum would be a 372XP. 

The key to ripping straight is go to Franks Penders School of Log splitting with a chain saw ;D  I went, and barely graduated ;D :)

The key to cutting your log length wise without killing yourself and the saw, as you point out, is to get a ripping blade for your saw.  Baileys has them and you can find them at this link.
http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=WP365+30LR&catID=

This link has a pic or two of the 46" log I split down the middle.
http://www.sawmillandtimberforum.com/index.php/topic,507.msg4976.html#new

I used a 30" bar with a ripping chain and then had to finish off the last 12+ inches by wedging the log apart from where I cut it.  I just used the good old eye ball training I got at Franks.  Turned out pretty good, all things considered. 

Keeping it straight wasnt to bad and after getting it all cut into lumber I would say I lost one board on each half from the chain cut. 
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Offline danweb

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2009, 06:16:49 AM »
O.K. Good advice Kirk on the saw. I definately dont want to be to light on that. So no special setup or any kind of rail system for cutting this 60" in half and then half again huh? That is fine by me. Thanks Kirk.
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2009, 11:15:41 AM »
Hi ya Dan.  I just finished sawing a 5' plus Oregon White Oak with my 044 with a 36" bar and a chisel chain.  The process took about 15 minutes for the halving cut and asbout the same for the quartering process, as I hit as 16 penny nail in the first cutting. :'(

I recently acquired a couple loads of Sequoia that will requsire some quartering and I plan on an 066 for that job and a 36" bar with a chisel bit chain.

One thing you might consider is attatching a 2 x 4 to the log for a straight edge, to help keep you alined in the direction you want to go.

Offline danweb

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2009, 01:08:19 PM »
Hey Frank. Yeah I remeber following the tale of the large "weeds" you handle. I appreciate the advice. So you dont use a ripping chain? Thats ok too. I didnt really want to spend the extra on a couple of those, but if I had too i would. Thats about the same size tree i have to cut 5' .  I do like the idea of attaching a 2 by for guidance, Id probably wind up with circle if I didnt have some kinda guide. I saw on one of those video sites ohn the net  my space or one like it, a couple of guys using gun powder to split a log, that looked kinda dangerous to me and I bet the customer would not appreciate me blowing out his windows. LOl . But I just needed the advice and I knew you or Kirk would come through. Thanks guys.
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Offline danweb

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2009, 01:19:37 PM »
One other thing I just remembered, was i was talking to a local sawyer the other day about splitting this log, and he said that the difference between the ripping chain and the chisel chain was that with the chisel if you were cutting with the grain, (Like down the center of the log) you would be moving long strips of wood and the chain may not clear properly, thus the desire for the use of a ripping chain that would remove the cut wood without getting stopped up. Does that sound abot right? Other than taht, is there any other reason for using the ripping over the chisel?
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Offline Stevem

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2009, 02:43:36 PM »
You can file a regular chain to make a ripping chain out of it, almost straight across (10 degrees?) but it takes a lot of metal off and then you have to re-file to get it to cut crosscut.  I believe a true ripping chain has some missing teeth to keep the shaving down to a managable level and the saw clear of shavings
Stevem
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Offline danweb

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2009, 05:14:57 PM »
Well, I'll let you guys know how it goes, and if I can, Im gonna take some pics. This wont be one of those big weeds like Franks, but it will be a huge one for me. One more question, just to kinda gage the progress, All things considered, How long would a quartering and then quartersawing of this 60" sugar maple take in a perfect world?
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Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2009, 06:15:39 PM »
Should not take you more than an hour, +- 30 minutes.

The sequoa's that Frank cuts are much softer than the maple you will be trying to tackle.  I have had no luck at all with a regular chain on hardwoods like Oak, Maple, etc.
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2009, 10:02:54 PM »
Dan, like I said I use a chisel chain, but forgot to say that it is a skip tooth.  Yes, long streamers will appear, but I have had no real problem in having them shoot through and onto the ground. Oh, there might be a couple three that catch up, but nothing of any consequence, to worry about.

Offline Mr Mom

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2009, 06:35:05 AM »
Ok frank eastcoast parttime logger question.....How do you move logs that big??
Any pic of the trucks that bring them??
How do you unload them??
Just some questions.
Thanks Alot Mr Mom

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2009, 08:14:43 PM »
Any pic of the trucks that bring them??

 :D  :laugh: :D  :laugh: :D :laugh: :D

I cant stop laughing!   :D :D :D :D
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2009, 08:31:11 AM »
Yep, I have all kinds of pictures of loaded trucks coming in here.  I just have to learn how to transfer them out of the camera to the forum.  That is the laughing issue for Kirk. :angel:

Offline Mr Mom

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2009, 11:44:34 AM »
It was just one of the dumb question that i get all the time.
I have them all the time.
Thanks Alot Mr Mom

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2009, 12:00:37 AM »
Great question Mr. Mom, but you have to understand Franks handicap when it comes to pictures :D ;)
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Offline wellsoff

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Re: Alaskan Chain Saw Mill
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2009, 05:19:43 AM »
If you have a Stihl, I use the the RSLFK chain with the stock angle, or a RSF chain with a 12 Deg grind on it. The RSLFK has an "L" shaped cutter, so its hard to find someone with a grinder with that shape wheel. But the RSF has a Rounded cutter that rips great at 12 Deg, and it's a easy chain to sharpen with a file or at your local service center. Thats gonna be a tuff mill. Go slow. Push only as hard as the saw wants to go. Good luck. Post some pics.