alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description alt image description

Author Topic: Tupalow tree  (Read 6744 times)

Offline Carl Middleton

  • Senior Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
  • Topics: 33
  • Referrals: 0
    • www.bktimbermill.com
Tupalow tree
« on: April 28, 2009, 06:26:23 PM »
Got a call from a arborist today abouta tupalow tree 70 + ft if I would want the logs What can the wood be used for?

Offline julian the woodnut

  • Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 24
  • Topics: 4
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Tupalow tree
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2009, 07:44:41 PM »
I've heard of tupelo being used for turning, but I have never personally seen it. A quick google search brought this up. Hope it helps.
http://www.ces.purdue.edu/extmedia/FNR/FNR-298-W.pdf

Offline Carl Middleton

  • Senior Contributor
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
  • Topics: 33
  • Referrals: 0
    • www.bktimbermill.com
Re: Tupalow tree
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2009, 07:56:01 PM »
Thanks Julian One of the farms out by me wanted 2x12 22' long As I am out of oak this long I was wondering about the topalow for this use

Offline Stephen Wiley

  • Moderator
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 219
  • Topics: 19
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Tupalow tree
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2009, 01:53:04 AM »
Carl,

One of the issues with Tupelo is warping on drying.

There are two species that are known commercially as tupelo, the Black Gum, Nyssa sylvatica, and Sour Gum, Nyssa aquatica.  Black gum is distributed from Michigan to Maine and south to Florida and Texas, while the Sour Gum is restricted to the swamps of the southeastern United States. 

Wood uses: pallets, rough floors, pulpwood, firewood, was once used for ox yokes. rollers in glass factories, pistol grips, veneers, railroad ties, furniture, mauls, pulleys, rollers, woodenware, shipping containers, millwork, veneer, plywood, cross ties, bridge ties and crossing planks, for baskets and handles. tobacco boxes, wheel hubs.

Workability: It is moderately strong, but difficult to glue. The wood is hard, cross-grained, and difficult to split, especially after drying. The sapwood of Tupelo is a light gray brown, while the heartwood is darker. It has interlocked grain, with a natural tendency to warp when dries, especially when flat sawn. It shows a characteristic figure when quartersawn. It has no characteristic odor or taste.  The average woodworker or lumberman has always found black gum difficult to work with because it has interconnected grain that runs both lengthwise and crosswise, making it almost impossible to split. This interlocked grain is good for solid blocks where wooden parts are needed that will not split. Makes excellent mallets for froes.