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Author Topic: Ripping chain....  (Read 16956 times)

Offline SDB777

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Ripping chain....
« on: June 24, 2010, 05:48:15 AM »
Running a Stilh MS390....currently I have a 24" Oregon Laser bar 0.50gauge w/Woodland 30RP chain, but I am thinking about upgrading a little.

Question:  If I were to go to a 32" Oregon bar 0.50gauge...would I be better off getting the LP ripping chain, or stick with the RP ripping chain?




Scott (what you guy that cut the big'uns think) B
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2010, 09:38:53 PM »
Scot, when I rip the larger logs to place on my MD mill. I just use my 044 witha 36" Oregon bar and a standard skip tooth chisel bit chain.

Offline SDB777

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2010, 06:14:27 AM »
Chisel tooth....really?  Leaves kind of a rough finish....or are you just 'trimming enough off' so the log will go in the throat?


I was thinking with the longer chain that a Low Profile chain wouldn't be as taxing on the powerhead.  At what point in bar lenght does it become necessary to add on another oiler?  The MS390 doesn't have an adjustable oiler(at least I can't find a screw to turn on it).





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Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2010, 09:53:35 AM »
The difference with Franks operation is the wood he is cutting is MUCH softer than the hardwoods your trying to cut Scott.  RP is all I use to split hardwoods with.  Chisel tooth would never get it done on our hardwoods.
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Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2010, 09:55:27 AM »
That chisle bit puts birds nest of long shavings on the out put side and you have to keep picking them out but it will cut like stink in soft wood. 
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Offline LeFranck

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Sv: Ripping chain....
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2011, 05:32:14 PM »
Scot, when I rip the larger logs to place on my MD mill. I just use my 044 witha 36" Oregon bar and a standard skip tooth chisel bit chain.

Why do you need to rip larger logs before placing them on your MD? Does your MD stands on a trailer?
Frank Thoresen

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Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2011, 01:01:57 AM »
Why do you need to rip larger logs before placing them on your MD? Does your MD stands on a trailer?

Large (with a capital L) logs need to be made smaller to fit on the mill.  Frank has a redwood in his yard that over 10' (3+meters) in diameter.   

I'll be cutting a redwood soon (I hope) that's 3 to 3 1/2 meters on the stump.  Even cut in half and laid round side down it will be over 5' (1 1/2 meters) high. 
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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2011, 08:07:58 AM »
You got that right, Steve.  I have had logs so big thast I have had to rip them into quarters or less, to saw them.  Now, gia, out o Northern Calif.  Has MD set her up with a much wider crossfeed system as well as much taller end stands, to manage the larger diameter logs of Redwood and Sequoia she saws.

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 09:45:05 AM »
HI, you want an oiler for anything over 30", that's a big bar your going to for that saw, if you have to use it, i would suggest a stock skip chain, it'll let that saw run a little smoother, you can then sharpen it where you feel comfortable running it, if it's bogging down or chunking your set too aggressive, steepen the angle a bit, run rich and always let it warm-up and cool down, your saw will last alot longer. and remember to cut the first and last 6-8" off the log before milling if the logs been sitting for any length of time.

Offline kpantherpro

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2011, 04:57:34 PM »
HI, you want an oiler for anything over 30", that's a big bar your going to for that saw, if you have to use it, i would suggest a stock skip chain, it'll let that saw run a little smoother, you can then sharpen it where you feel comfortable running it, if it's bogging down or chunking your set too aggressive, steepen the angle a bit, run rich and always let it warm-up and cool down, your saw will last alot longer. and remember to cut the first and last 6-8" off the log before milling if the logs been sitting for any length of time.
I hate when i do that...lol replied to the wrong question... ooops

Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2011, 12:35:53 AM »
Well quit it. :laugh:
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Offline LeFranck

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2011, 07:30:42 PM »
You got that right, Steve.  I have had logs so big thast I have had to rip them into quarters or less, to saw them.  Now, gia, out o Northern Calif.  Has MD set her up with a much wider crossfeed system as well as much taller end stands, to manage the larger diameter logs of Redwood and Sequoia she saws.

I tried to understand what you wrote Frank but I did not get it all. Who got the MD with wider crossfeeds and taller end stands? Can you give us some measures on the set up the MD got?
Frank Thoresen

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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #12 on: December 25, 2011, 11:53:54 AM »
There is a gal in Northern California, by the name of Gia.   She had MD build a crossfeed system for large diameter logs.  I believe the system can handle 12' diam. logs.  If Sawmill John ever comes around here again he could tell you what they did,.  He was the engineer that designed the system for her.  If you go to Gia portable sawmilling on Google, you might well find her website.

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2011, 10:11:38 AM »

http://www.tccustommilling.com/

http://www.mcguiresplace.net/Sawmill-Gia%20Carrozzi's%20Recycled%20Treasures/

Contact: Gia Carrozzi
True Cut Custom Milling
email: thesawer@suddenlink.net
phone: 707-498-1122

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Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2011, 02:35:05 PM »
Thank you Kirk. ;D

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2011, 10:44:46 AM »
Soke with Gia a bit ago and she said the mill set up has a 14' crossfeed system with eight foot endstands.  She can cut a log that is 25' long and 8' in diameter.  She also said she crushed the track system with a log that rolled off of her lift truck forks.  The mill is up and running again, however.

Offline LeFranck

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2012, 03:46:05 PM »
Thank you both Frank P and Kirk. Now I understand what kind of a MD sawmill Gia got. The numbers shows that she got a nice sized sawmill. She got even a lager MD than I have in Congo. I guess my MD can handle up to 20' long and 7' in diameter. I hope I don't need a larger one  :laugh:

« Last Edit: January 01, 2012, 03:58:28 PM by LeFranck »
Frank Thoresen

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Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2012, 08:40:12 AM »
LeFrank,

FWIW

The MD will cut any size log (diameter) without a factory frame.  Take a look at the last picture from there web site photo gallery.  It's called the board and block method.  I used the MD with this method for about two years.  Had end stands but never set them up.  Was always cutting 50+ inch wood and only had 4'  stands. 

Part of their standard equipment used to be a soft faced sledge hammer to drive head hardened (hard facing welded on) lag screws and a spinner wrench with a welded on socket to remove them.
 
I think you need different "feet" for the saw frame so they can ride on the boards and the lumber gauges have to be added instead of using the rack and pinion to get the right width.

Length only depends on how much track you have and you could probably manufacture some extra length your self.

I had a rope start model and it was a little scary with the saw overhead pulling that rope.  Had visions of the saw starting and falling off on top of me.  Never happened but the thought was there.
Stevem
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Offline LeFranck

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2012, 11:21:47 AM »
Thank you Steve for that reminder.
I have always thought that this method is a scary one when starting and ending (What if it falls down?).
Do the MD factory got any manual on how to do this right? Even if its very easy, the first time will be a bit scary one I think.
I think its better to stand on an adjustable platform rather using rope I guess.

Here is the picture I guess you referred to: 

Frank Thoresen

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Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2012, 04:45:53 PM »
Yes, that's the picture I was referring to!  There's another picture of board and block with a different setup on a smaller log in the gallery.

But I did it a little different.  All my  horizontal boards were the same length. Too long is better than too short.  They can always stick out from the edges.  As those in the picture are set up, the top cut might get a little tipsy when it got all the way to the right.  Bottom board same problem.  Longer boards would be better.   And I used solid blocking between them, not just uprights.   The blocking is just spacers, not really weight bearing but does prevent sagging and log rolling.  If you're cutting cants I guess upright pieces for blocks would be OK.  Oh, and you predrill the holes for the lag screws.  I think the factory provided a brace and bit but not sure on that.  I had one to use.

You build both ends up the same because what you take out determines the depth of the next cut one end at a time.   With multiple pieces for blocking if necessary I could just take out some of the blocking and reset the horizontal board on top of what was left to change the depth I originally planed.  Depended on what the log looked like as I opened it up.  Blocking needs to be standardized to the size wood you normally cut, at least close.  Top edger blade can be adjusted for exact board size. 

Consideration for the saw kerf has to be made if you don't use the top edger blade.  The amount of drop is how much you're going to cut out of the log.  Board size will be that less the kerf of the edger(s) .  Two edger blades = 1/4" less of board if your cutting say two 2" x 4"s  with a depth of cut of 8"s

The two ends don't have to be level, just parallel.  Eyeball sighting is good enough and fine tune based on the track shoe.  Slightly down on the off side helps keep the saw tight against the log and makes it easier to move into the next cut.  And oiling the boards helps.  I applied used motor oil.

Notice the hook on the right end of the top board.  It's attached to the saw frame crank via a thin cable and is used to pull the saw over for the next cut,  You need spares because they can get tangled in the bottom edger blade and get too short to use.

You need to use the saw stop/return block so the saw doesn't run to far down the track and overbalance the operator end. 
It's attached with a small C clamp and thus movable.

Other than going too far past the end of the log it's a very stable set up.  Just the pull rope starting is the only thing that ever bothered me and yours probably has electric start so you shouldn't have any qualms.  And the saw I ran was the old style with a narrower track and not near a ridged.  Wider frame is more stable.

Factory should have complete directions at least in their archives. 

It's been 25+ years since I ran a MD so I'm having to dig out old memories.


Stevem
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Offline LeFranck

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2012, 05:13:08 PM »
Wow. That's some good info Steve. Thanks

I hope I've not overlooked it but I'm wondering if the MD can kick back the frame when it stands on the block? Should I secure the frame to the block with a wire?
I didn't purchase the block screws nor the spinner wrench. I guess I can make it myself.

Now its just for us to find that +8' log  :laugh:
Frank Thoresen

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Offline Stevem

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Re: Ripping chain....
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2012, 11:30:53 PM »
My understanding is the saw was designed to cut big logs on board and blocks.  It's really a simple system else I couldn't understand it.

I got the feeling that the end stands were kind of an after thought and made it easier to cut smaller logs.  The little two wheel trailer was all there was for transport or you put it all in the back of a pickup. Trailer was used like a seesaw pivot to put the saw on the boards.   
Stevem
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