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Author Topic: Live edge log slabs  (Read 18946 times)

Offline Albc

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Live edge log slabs
« on: June 18, 2014, 01:02:25 AM »
I am looking for some assistance on how to look after your slabs until used in projects. I want to saw a natural slab of Doug fir for a dining table. On logs that I saw, I seal the end grain to prevent splitting. I assume you need to do the same thing here. Also, how long to dry them? Any help or suggestions from you people with the experience would be helpful. Thanks.
We may not be able to change where we came from, but we can change where we go from here!

Offline Stevem

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Re: Live edge log slabs
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2014, 10:36:09 AM »
Welcome aboard.  always good to add internationalism to the site.

On the slabs:FWIW

I'm on a steep learning curve myself and just starting to reap slabs from my kiln.

Seal the ends for sure but you'll probably still get cracks which can be dealt with later. Time for air drying depends on the humidity level but figure (very loose) a year per inch of thickness and then it will only go to EMC (http://ri.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A86.J73l_qJTPBkA_74PxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByb3B2a242BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--/RV=2/RE=1403219814/RO=10/RU=http%3a%2f%2fwww.esf.edu%2fnekda%2fdocuments%2fEMCBackground-PeterGarrahan.pdf/RK=0/RS=LflyPtykiIaZSgTA2y.JkfTX4r8-.
While drying, slabs need to be supported, level or at least "even", and a lot of air flow space over and under and out of the sun.  Supports need to be at the very ends and then every 16" to 24". Spacing depends somewhat on thickness.  Closer is fine.  Lots of weight on top, lots. Did I say level ?   

If bugs have gotten into the wood (generally the sap wood) something needs to be done about them.  Either chemical (Bora care?) or heat treating to kill them.  Bug holes are neat but not the bugs.  Kind of bad to have bugs coming out of a dining room table.

The slabs will need some sort of planing and sanding before use.  In use both sides need to be sealed so wood movement is equal to prevent cupping when seasonal humidity changes occur.  If you use resin finish on the top it is "self" leveling up to 1/8"s.   
Stevem
Because you can doesn't mean you should!

Offline Albc

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Re: Live edge log slabs
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2014, 01:08:35 AM »
Hey thanks for your input. I had forgotten about using borax. You mentioned a kiln. Is it a solar kiln? I have some ideas for one. I knew one guy that claimed his worked pretty good.
We may not be able to change where we came from, but we can change where we go from here!

Offline Frank Pender - AKA "Tail Gunner"

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Re: Live edge log slabs
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2015, 08:48:56 AM »
Howdid you ever come out on your slab drying and table building?

Offline Stevem

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Re: Live edge log slabs
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2015, 09:33:19 AM »
My kiln is electric with a dehumidifier.  Too many air leaks right now.  It takes out the water but doesn't get hot enough to kill bugs.  Have to do that someway.

Franks is wood heat which makes a lot of sense considering that's what we have left over from sawing.
Stevem
Because you can doesn't mean you should!

Offline Albc

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Re: Live edge log slabs
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2015, 10:00:20 AM »
I have some 3" slabs air drying still. So no table yet. The slabs are looking good!
We may not be able to change where we came from, but we can change where we go from here!