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Author Topic: New to Milling  (Read 186 times)

Offline traded

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New to Milling
« on: April 22, 2021, 08:13:39 PM »
I've recently purchased and setup my Hudson Oscar 330 and I am having one heck of a time getting the unit level.  The track comes in 7.5' sections and I have 30'  in total.  I created a fairly level surface with compacted material, then used 6x6 pressure treated sections underneath the joints of the tracks.  I'm using asphalt shingles as shims to get the track to as level as can be.  I'm looking for any ideas to help in ease of leveling every use; I may start over with a concrete pad, but wanted to make some cash to have the mill support itself for upgrades.

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: New to Milling
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2021, 03:14:39 PM »
Welcome to the forum. 

Most track systems I have seen are laid down on level cement or steel beams supported by cement pillars every 4-8 feet.  I suspect shingles are going to only offer a short-lived effect as they will slowly squash down, especially on hot days.  Bouncing a heavy log on the mill will only make that problem worse.
 
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Offline Ox

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Re: New to Milling
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2021, 09:19:26 AM »
I don't know how rugged your track system is, but I'm using farm jacks like you'd see on the front of a tongue for a piece of farm equipment.  During use at a new site the mill will vibrate and settle a little, just give a quick twist on the proper jacks and you're back straight again.  This will only work on a sawmill frame that has some semblance of structural rigidity though.
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1989 GMC 3500 4x4 diesel dump and plow truck, 1964 Oliver 1600 Industrial with Parsons loader and backhoe, 1986 Zetor 5211, Cat's Claw sharpener, single tooth setter, homemade Linn Lumber 1900 style mill, old tools