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Author Topic: Sawing an Old Walnut log  (Read 707 times)

Offline furu

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Sawing an Old Walnut log
« on: January 08, 2022, 11:47:37 PM »
I have never milled walnut.  Had a guy contact me 2 days ago asking about "milling" a walnut log section that is 41 inches long.  My bunks are a  little bit closer than 41 inches so should be able to do it without putting a pad down to keep it from falling through the bunks. 

My question and lack of knowledge never having milled reclaimed timbers, dried logs or for that matter anything that is not green is what should  I consider.  If I mill this section making slabs out of this old dry walnut what are the pitfalls if any.  I have read that dry logs need a different hook angle but is that true?  Not really interested in buying blades for a unicorn customer's log section.  I was told this was in the corner of their grandfather's barn and they believe it is about 50 years old.  Who knows if that is accurate or not.

Any ideas pitch them out.  It sure has been quiet on here as of late.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.

Offline Kirk Allen

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Re: Sawing an Old Walnut log
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2022, 07:17:13 AM »
The only thing with dry logs is it iwill require you to slow down a bit compared to when it was green.  I cut about 8 walnut logs for a local farmer a few years ago and he said they had been stored in his dad's barn for 60 years.  They were dry as a bone.  Sawdust was DUST!  it cut fine, just a little harder than it would if green. 

Use a new blade and you should be fine.

As far as activity, I think all this world of misinformation more folks are getting involved and pushing back. 

I have a ton of pictures I need to get posted as I finaly got my 100x40 wood storage building built!  Now all my cut wood will be nice and dry inside the new building.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one is watching!

Offline A.O.

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Re: Sawing an Old Walnut log
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2022, 09:22:51 AM »
The only thing with dry logs is it iwill require you to slow down a bit compared to when it was green.  I cut about 8 walnut logs for a local farmer a few years ago and he said they had been stored in his dad's barn for 60 years.  They were dry as a bone.  Sawdust was DUST!  it cut fine, just a little harder than it would if green. 

Use a new blade and you should be fine.

As far as activity, I think all this world of misinformation more folks are getting involved and pushing back. 

I have a ton of pictures I need to get posted as I finaly got my 100x40 wood storage building built!  Now all my cut wood will be nice and dry inside the new building.

Very nice, all the wood I cut sits out in the open, would be great to have a cover!  Look forward to the pics

Offline Ox

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Re: Sawing an Old Walnut log
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2022, 11:07:35 AM »
Just like Kirk said, use a new blade and you'll be fine for this one log for sure.  But if you were doing this all the time you'd probably find out that the 4 degree blades that Cutting Edge sells and maintains would be the best bet.

I look forward to seeing the pics of your new barn, Kirk!

Everybody keep your head up and on a swivel - society has gone completely mental.  I've had a feeling of impending doom of sorts for the last 15 years or so.....seems like we're marching (as a whole) straight for the cliff edge.
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Offline A.O.

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Re: Sawing an Old Walnut log
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2022, 12:54:22 PM »
Just like Kirk said, use a new blade and you'll be fine for this one log for sure.  But if you were doing this all the time you'd probably find out that the 4 degree blades that Cutting Edge sells and maintains would be the best bet.

I look forward to seeing the pics of your new barn, Kirk!

Everybody keep your head up and on a swivel - society has gone completely mental.  I've had a feeling of impending doom of sorts for the last 15 years or so.....seems like we're marching (as a whole) straight for the cliff edge.

Agreed!

Offline furu

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Re: Sawing an Old Walnut log
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2022, 07:49:29 PM »

I have a ton of pictures I need to get posted as I finally got my 100x40 wood storage building built!  Now all my cut wood will be nice and dry inside the new building.


100x 40 that is NICE.  Is it a pole barn style or a metal building?  Yes pictures at different points during construction would be very nice and as much detail as you can share.

I have been thinking that a 60 x100 would be nice but am concerned the span will be very expensive unless I put supports in the middle of the building.  Free span at 60 feet is not cheap from what I am finding.

When we were in Idaho and western Montana back in October and November the wife commented that they must have the best pole barn builders in the world as there were some marvelous buildings on every piece of acreage that you saw.  Some dream shops that you would give your eye teeth for.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing.
Integrity is not just doing the right thing when no one is looking.
Integrity is doing the right thing when no one else will ever even know.